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What does your daily drive to and from work look like? Is it very far? How long does it take? Do you go the same route every day?

I ask these questions, because I had an epiphany the other day as I was driving home. The distance was only a few miles, but sometimes, it could take me 30-45 minutes to go those few miles. I was navigating my way through traffic when I noticed that I was making the same adjustments every single time I drove. Those adjustments were saving me time. I knew, when traffic started to back up, that if I switched lanes, I would keep moving forward, even if at a slow pace. I also knew, that if I actually exited the highway and tried to go the back roads, it would take me longer. As I pondered, this epiphany, I started to pay closer attention to my route. I noticed if I made a few additional adjustments, I could save even more time. I was managing a problem to navigate in such a way that I could have the best possible outcome.

Problem management in the office is a lot like navigating rush hour traffic. If you take the time to really think about the issues, you can navigate the problem more smoothly, and efficiently. At the same time, you can work to avoid the knee-jerk reactions that so many people are plagued by. Think o f exiting the highway to avoid the traffic jam only to be plagued by stop lights and the other drivers who thought the same way you did. Swift can have it’s advantages, but only in the short term and only if done smartly. If you take the time to really solve the issue, then that resolution can have long lasting effects. Pay attention to what is going on around you. What are some trends you are seeing, good OR bad? Take the time to think about what little adjustments you can make in your behavior or your team’s behavior to make a positive impact.

I had a problem in that I wanted to spend more time with my family. My kids are only going to be this age a little while and I want to give them as much time as I can. I estimate I saved over 40 hours a year by putting a little extra thought into my route. That is more time with my family … and less time getting upset at the long line of cars that are not paying attention. That, of course, is another topic on its own. Wow, it looks like I solved two problems . . . see what I mean?!?!

What do you think? How do you navigate problems at work or with your projects? Do knee-jerk reactions hurt you organization?

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