After the Implosion: Leading your team out of the ashes

As a project leader, you have, undoubtedly, run in to issues with a project that will raise eyebrows in a negative way. You might have even experienced an implosion like I mentioned a couple of posts ago. What do you do now? What do you do AFTER the implosion may just define who you are in the eyes of your team.

In my years of experience, I have seen the good, the bad, and the truly unforgettably ugly that comes with the different types of responses. Some make me clap and shout, some make me sad and shake my head. Others, however, make me angry with a “how dare you” type of reaction. Sure, there are countless styles and things to say, but here are some types of  responses that will help your team look up to you, trust you, and even follow you. If you were my leader and you said any of these to me? I would stand up and shout “WELL DONE, LET’S GO!!”

  1. “I take responsibility.” Here are three words that will immediately take the pressure off of your team and allow them to regroup. Letting them know that you aren’t going to hang the team out to dry is very settling. Even if you were not the cause of the implosion, as the project leader and “face of the project,” you are ultimately responsible so step up to the plate. Of course, if there are personnel issues that need to be addressed, take care of them quickly, but do so privately.
  2. “How can I help?” One thing I always tell my teams is that I am here to place an “umbrella of protection” over them. That means that I try to shield them from outside distractions that can derail a team. If I need to do a better job, then I want to know from the team. Of course, if the team needs anything else, I want to know that too! As a leader, I am simply here to help my team succeed; it isn’t about me. I will even bring them coffee if they need a little pick-me-up!
  3. “We can fix this.” Telling your team that we can fix it gives them the confidence to know that you feel confident in them to be able to steer the ship back into the right direction. It will empower them to dust off their pants and get going.
  4. “Let’s make this thing work, TOGETHER!” Wow, six simple words with enough impact to elicit change like you’ve never seen. I know in my past, I never experienced these words and never felt like I had management’s backing. I was always left to my own devices to figure things out. Always out on an island with nothing more than a stick to draw a plan in the sand. Don’t leave your team to fix things on their own. You have the experience to help them. They look to you to help pick them up. Remember, the project that imploded was a team failure, not THEIR failure. Roll up your sleeves and get in there. You won’t regret it, and they won’t forget it.

These may seem simple, or even common sense, but remember, common sense ain’t so common. If you do any of these, your team will follow you to the ends of the earth!

Happy leading!!

What are some ideas you have for getting your team to dust themselves off? I’d love to hear them.

Navigating Traffic: How your daily commute can help you solve problems

What does your daily drive to and from work look like? Is it very far? How long does it take? Do you go the same route every day?

I ask these questions, because I had an epiphany the other day as I was driving home. The distance was only a few miles, but sometimes, it could take me 30-45 minutes to go those few miles. I was navigating my way through traffic when I noticed that I was making the same adjustments every single time I drove. Those adjustments were saving me time. I knew, when traffic started to back up, that if I switched lanes, I would keep moving forward, even if at a slow pace. I also knew, that if I actually exited the highway and tried to go the back roads, it would take me longer. As I pondered, this epiphany, I started to pay closer attention to my route. I noticed if I made a few additional adjustments, I could save even more time. I was managing a problem to navigate in such a way that I could have the best possible outcome.

Problem management in the office is a lot like navigating rush hour traffic. If you take the time to really think about the issues, you can navigate the problem more smoothly, and efficiently. At the same time, you can work to avoid the knee-jerk reactions that so many people are plagued by. Think o f exiting the highway to avoid the traffic jam only to be plagued by stop lights and the other drivers who thought the same way you did. Swift can have it’s advantages, but only in the short term and only if done smartly. If you take the time to really solve the issue, then that resolution can have long lasting effects. Pay attention to what is going on around you. What are some trends you are seeing, good OR bad? Take the time to think about what little adjustments you can make in your behavior or your team’s behavior to make a positive impact.

I had a problem in that I wanted to spend more time with my family. My kids are only going to be this age a little while and I want to give them as much time as I can. I estimate I saved over 40 hours a year by putting a little extra thought into my route. That is more time with my family … and less time getting upset at the long line of cars that are not paying attention. That, of course, is another topic on its own. Wow, it looks like I solved two problems . . . see what I mean?!?!

What do you think? How do you navigate problems at work or with your projects? Do knee-jerk reactions hurt you organization?